How the Bail Process Works When Contracting With a Bail Bond Company in Oklahoma City

How the Bail Process Works When Contracting With a Bail Bond Company in Oklahoma City

Bail constitutes an agreement between the court and a person charged with a crime. The court agrees to release this person from jail if he or she pays a specified amount. That money is returned if the defendant appears in court on the trial dates, even in cases that lead to a conviction. Unfortunately, bail is often set too high for people to afford it. If they don’t have friends or relatives who are able or willing to provide the cash or some type of collateral, such as real estate, they may contact a bail bond company Oklahoma City. A friend or family member can make this contact if the defendant is not allowed to do so or cannot pay the bondsman’s fee.

The fee is a percentage of the bail. For instance, a company that charges 10 percent of bail requires a nonrefundable payment of $250 for $2,500 bail. Usually, the bonds service does not actually pay bail but makes a commitment to do so if the customer does not appear for trial. A bail bond company Oklahoma City is known for has a professional and legal relationship with the court system in which the company is responsible for bail in situations where the individual skips town. Documents are signed to this effect so an organization such as Ken Boyer Bail Bonds may intervene and allow someone to go free. Visit Kenboyerbailbonds.com for more help in understanding the process.

Many crimes have specific required or suggested bail amounts, known as the bail schedule. This makes it easier for someone to go free on nights or weekends when judges are not in court making decisions on these matters. Bail is higher for more serious crimes. Depending on the jurisdiction and the situation, judges may be allowed to reduce the bail schedule if they feel this is reasonable. Judges look for indications of stability, such as a defendant who has lived in the area for a long time, owns a house, or has been working for one employer for many years. In contrast, a defendant who just moved to town a year ago and is unemployed may be considered a flight risk, especially if the offense is a serious one.

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